Jump to Navigation

February 2014 Archives

Need Help? Don't Wait!

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Lawmakers focus on alternative criminal penalties

The blog often focuses on the spectrum of laws in the state of Texas that address criminal behavior and criminal accusations. The condition of criminal law in Texas has a reputation for being harsh, and the state certainly carries some of the heaviest approaches to criminal prosecution in the country. What is often skirted over, however, but equally important, are the consequences that follow a criminal conviction.

Alleged "Craigslist killer" teen faces murder charge

Being accused of a crime is a serious matter, especially in the state of Texas, and in order reduce charges or eliminate prosecution altogether, one must combat a prosecutor's allegations. Implementing an element of criminal defense when one is facing a criminal conviction is a truly crucial approach.

Texas man not indicted for death of an officer

Many Texas residents are familiar with the fact that they are entitled to certain constitutional rights to protect themselves from unreasonable searches and seizures. This often means that before authorities are permitted to search an individual's person or their home, police must have probable cause.

Decriminalizing marijuana in Texas - could it be coming?

The State of Texas has been talking big change in these recent weeks. Previous blog posts have noted that a number of local legislators, business owners and community members have been pushing toward criminal defense reform. Specifically, there is a movement to reconfigure the criminal justice system so as to reduce sentencing applied to lessor, non-violent crimes. Recently, Governor Rick Perry hopped on the train toward reform.

FindLaw Network